Welcome to the Jones & Hyman Family History Site

We're so pleased you dropped in to visit our site. We've worked for years on this family and its connections to our ancestors. Here on our genealogy website, you'll find info, documents, media of different formats such as John Paul's maternal lines as well as Donna Marie's ancestry. We've traced Donna's Eaddy side back to 1700 Scotland as well as John's maternal line back to Lithuania, where my grandparents were born around 1892. They and my Great Aunt Katie immigrated to America sometime in the early 1900's. The Hyman's, Eaddy's, the Woodson's and Bridgers had made their way to the Florence, South Carolina area and surrounding counties. We are also dedicating this site to locating and documenting as much as we can about our family's history and genealogy.

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The History of Hymansville, South Carolina

I feel that I need to clarify some points about this document, The History of Hymansville, Marion County, South Carolina. Donna's 2nd cousin, Phillip M. Hyman, of Cross, South Carolina published the book Hymansville, South Carolina. However, the story of Hymansville is more a history of Pamplico, South Carolina, which is right down the road from Hymansville. If you look at the map (lower Marion County, Cain Parish, in 1882, you don't see Pamplico at all. That's because Pamplico, South Carolina had not been established yet. That doesn't happen until 1909-1910. Although there were people and businesses there prior to 1910, The actual town of Pamplico wasn't officially established until 1910.

Things Change: At this point in time, I do not have enough information to write the history of Hymansville as I would like to. The history of Hymansville would cover over a century in time, beginning in the early nineteenth century, and fading into oblivion in the early twentieth century. The demise of Hymansville as a thriving commerce center, can best be blamed on the golden rule, "he who has the gold, makes the rules", and that is the governing rule of all economics.

This area, which is now referred to as "Old Marion County", encompassed places with such names as Big Swamp, Hymansville, Prospect, Hannah, Salem, Dewitt’s Landing, Orum, Claussen, Gibbs Cross Roads, Friendfield, and Evergreen. In the nineteenth and early twentieth century these names meant something, but, as they say things change. Today, and through most of the twentieth century , the only name that has stood out in now eastern Florence County is "Pamplico", a bought and paid for mill town, his town, "Dargan's Town".

My great aunt, Magdalen "Maggie" Hyman Duncan, after a life time of hobnobbing around the country, returned to home ground to await her fate in life, the inevitable. In the year 1974, with time to kill, assisted by Ruby Evans Bostick, they put together the only written history that I know of, of the area once known as Cain Township, Marion County, which is now a part of eastern Florence County.

Out of respect for my Aunt "Maggie", the following I copied verbatim, no editing, no ad-libbing, and may she now rest in peace. Phillip M Hyman, 2001

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Meet Our Family

Our Pages

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Discover Our Families

Aggie and Emery Bridgers

Aggie and Emery married 11 Dec 1907 & had 6 children: Lee, Robert, Jesse, Nellie, John and Graham.

Joseph and Rose Smith

Joseph Nicodemus Norkus immigrated from Lithuania. Married Rozalia Marija Danelute. They had a daughter, Rose Mary Smith.

Bryant and Adalaide Hyman

Bryant Andrew Hyman married Adalaide Haynes abt 1876 in Pamplico, South Carolina and had 12 children.

John and Lottie Jones

John Luther Jones married Lottie Jane Ackerson 10 Aug 1896 in Essex Junction, Essex, Chittenden Vermont and had 14 children.


The Bones of My Bones

The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it. It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family. It goes to deep pride that the fathers fought and some died to make and keep us a nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before. 'It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before.' by Della M. Cummings Wright; Rewritten by her granddaughter Dell Jo Ann McGinnis Johnson; Edited and Reworded by Tom Dunn, 1943.




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